What’s the Difference Between Grammar Correction and Grammar Trolling?

Prescriptive English grammar seems to be one of those things that either impassions you or inspires some level of dread. Lovers of English grammar and usage are energized by mastering the rules of a messy and disorganized language. For the rest of us, our feelings run the gamut from indifference to loathing as we muddle through a seemingly arbitrary organizational system and apply it to something as individual as language. There’s pride. There’s resentment. There’s a lot in between.
Most of us live in the “in between.” We understand that following traditional grammar and usage rules helps us succeed at work and in our communities. It makes us better communicators. We do our best to write and speak well and to help our friends and loved ones do the same. It would be great if we could leave it as that—just a bunch of well-meaning people trying their best. Unfortunately, there is an ugly side to this pursuit of grammatical correctness.

Some people take it upon themselves to “police” grammar online or at work. When they use restraint and tact, these people can positively contribute to their communities. Sadly, many people miss the mark and consider “foolish” grammar mistakes justification for making others feel bad. These are grammar trolls. They are language bullies. And as well meaning as they think their efforts are, all us in-betweeners (56 percent) pretty much agree that peer grammar correction is not such a good idea. Language bullying destroys trust, hurts communities, and is just plain mean. (#StopGrammarTrolls)

Understanding Who Grammar Trolls Are


It’s likely that you know one or two people who infuriate others with their pedantic and vocal approach to grammar. It’s possible that you’re worried you might be a grammar troll. (Here’s a hint: if you have ever wished you had an app for correcting people’s texts, you are probably a grammar troll.) Language bullies are everywhere and come in all shapes and sizes, but they’re easy to spot because these trolls have some typical characteristics.
Hyper-corrects self and others

Focuses on relatively minor grammar and writing mistakes (e.g., typos)

Makes broad statements and exhibits black-and-white thinking

Insults, mocks, or shames others over writing mistakes

If we break each one of these down, you’ll get a clearer picture:

First, grammar trolls have a (compulsive?) need to correct grammar and other linguistic mistakes. This alone makes them scientifically proven jerks. This perfectionism can stem from a general need for control or from a desire to impose control on one sphere of influence when other areas are perceived as chaotic.
Trolls also tend to call out minor language errors as a front for a lack of deeper understanding. They rely on typos, missing words, and stale grammar myths (e.g., never end a sentence with a preposition) to prop up their “contributions.”

Trolls have a flair for generalizations and overstatement, particularly of their own opinions about grammar or writing—it’s all or nothing with them.

Finally—and this shouldn’t be a surprise—language bullies lack empathy for other writers. They often assume that all writers have had the same experiences with language that they have had and, therefore, have “no excuse” not to “know better.” It seems lost on trolls that while it’s easier now than ever to improve your grammar, we’re still not all starting at the same place. Nor do we necessarily want everyone to follow the rules all the time.




Drawing the Line Between Trolling and Helping

As a language lover, you might look at that list and think, “Geez, this looks familiar.” There is a fine line between a language troll and a helpful grammarian, which is why we’ve made the case before that you shouldn’t ever correct others’ grammar. However, there are some differences that deserve attention.
The critical differentiator is motivation. Trolls and bullies correct people for their own gratification—to vent anger, to feel superior, to connect with others, etc. Grammar samaritans offer advice and corrections for others’ benefit—to notify the small business that tweeted a typo or to help that co-worker who keeps using “their” incorrectly in company memos. If you’re not sure which bucket you fall into, ask yourself this: Why are you correcting this person’s or group’s grammar? Think seriously about this one. If you’re doing it for any other reason besides helping that person or group, you’re bullying. If you’re so sure that you’re doing it to be helpful, ask yourself this final telling question: how are you going to correct them? If you considered anything other than a tactful private message or conversation, you’re probably bullying.

Why are you correcting this person’s or group’s grammar? Think seriously about this one. If you’re doing it for any other reason besides helping that person or group, you’re bullying.

To be clear, bullying

Is for the troll’s gratification

Focuses on petty errors

Destroys trust within the community or group and creates an us-vs.-them dynamic

Often degrades others

Is often public

While helpful correction

Is for others’ benefit

Deals with substantial errors or small errors that have a strong, cumulative influence

Creates trust within the community or group and is inclusive

Is tactful and considerate

Stays private

Grammar trolls are pedants whose love of language and being correct trumps their love of community and people. Grammar samaritans are those who use their passion and love to build community and trust. For the majority of us on the fence about grammar, we can all come together around our frustration with language trolls. When it comes to helping with grammar and language bullying, there is no in between. You’re helpful or you’re not.


What is your experience with grammar trolls? Let us know on social media with #nogrammartrolls.

False Agreements and How They Drive Characters in Your Fiction or Memoir

Today  I share an excellent blog by my favourite writing coach Mary Carroll Moore on the topic – False Agreements and How They Drive Characters in Your Fiction or Memoir. I am positive you will have greater understanding of what drives a character after reading this. 

What I call the “inner story” in fiction or memoir just refers to the transformation of a character or narrator through a series of outer events. It’s pretty simple, but its success depends on something called “false agreements.”  

Without this transformation, and the false agreements that propel it, a story is just a list of crises. Readers want to witness growth. 

 Transformation doesn’t just occur, right? It usually happens from a series of events that create change. To make each change real for the reader, we have to consider where the character’s journey starts. Usually, there is something they don’t fully understand. Something they are challenged by.

I like to look at this as a kind of agreement. The character decides something is true–even if it isn’t–and agrees to operate as if it is. As the story goes along, the writer challenges this belief, conviction, desire or hope or fear, this agreement with self, another, or situation, and slowly proves it false.  

At the beginning, the false agreement might be quite intact. As the story goes along, each event breaks down this agreement. By the end, even the character must see that it’s not real. By the end, there is a new realization.

What are some false agreements in story?

In Janet Fitch’s novel White Oleander, the false agreement is that the narrator, a teenage girl, believes she can help her mother stay out of danger. This proves false when the mother decides to kill her boyfriend and ends up in prison, abandoning her daughter.

In Jeanette Walls’s memoir The Glass Castle, the false agreement is that the narrator, a young girl, believes that her crazy family is eccentric but normal. This falls apart as the parents take more risks and put the girl in danger.    

In Lief Enger’s novel Peace Like a River, the false agreement is that justice can prevail–when a young girl is attacked by boys in town and her brother defends her, his family can bring him back into the family. Proven false when the brother runs away and aligns with a serial killer.
A false agreement will always be revealed as false by the end of the book. It may be accepted, then denied, then accepted again during the story–humans rarely travel a straight line in growth–but it is exposed by the end for what it is. Even if the character ends up in permanent denial, the reader has seen the agreement as fully false.

Your Weekly Writing Exercise: How to Set Up a False Agreement in Your Story

Understanding a false agreement means really knowing your character. If you didn’t get a sense of the false agreement last week, here are some next steps. 

Most writers start by describing the status quo that the story starts with. What does everybody put up with, to get along? What are the accepted beliefs?    

Some examples of false agreements from different books I’ve read lately:

1. If I’m good enough, nothing bad will happen.

2. If I protect my sister, she won’t be abused.

3. If I go there in person, I can find the truth.

4. If I keep silent, nobody will get hurt.

There are hundreds of possibilities, and yours will be unique. The “hook” of your story starts from this false agreement. Because something will happen to immediately cast doubt over this false agreement, right? That’s what launches your story.
Once you have your false agreement sketched out (spend 15-20 minutes freewriting on what it could be), your next step is to chart how that agreement will get busted up.

In all stories, there are small and large epiphanies where the character gradually realizes the agreement may not be all it’s cracked up to be. Maybe a hint of that is early in the story, within the first third. It can be a small epiphany, or turning point.  

But the character often perseveres and tries to keep the false agreement going. Then there’s a bigger event that cracks it even more: often, at this point, the character decides not to take this #%$$ anymore and reinvents themselves or gets new help or new clues. This might happen midway through the story.  

There’s is often a revision of the false agreement, a new false agreement, if you will, that is closer to the truth but not quite it. (Why? Because you still have half the story to get through, and false agreements create the conflict that drives the character. So you don’t want to get rid of the false agreement entirely, not yet.)

Usually, near the end of the story, the smaller epiphanies result in a major one. At this point, the character sees truth.  

They become different, fundamentally. And they make changes that really show how far they have come since the start of the story.

Big-Picture Editing and Word Count Per Scene

Big-Picture Editing and Word Count Per Scene  – today’s guest post by Kristina Stanley. 
As a writer, you’ve probably read there are recommended lengths for a manuscript depending on the genre you write in. We’ve done some research and thought we’d share that with you.

In order of length, word count guidelines for a few of the popular genres are:

Novellas: 20,000 to 30,000

Middle Grade: 25,000 to 40,000

Romance: 40,000 to 100,000

Young Adult: 50,000 to 80,000

Mysteries, thrillers, and suspense: 70,000 to 100,000

Paranormal: 75,000 to 95,000

Fantasy: 90,000 to 100,000

Horror: 80,000 to 100,000

Science Fiction: 95,000 to 125,000

Historical: 100,000 to 120,000

Genre length may vary with different publishers, so check submission guidelines carefully. If you’re self-publishing, readers of the genres have come to expect a certain word count, and you don’t want to disappoint them, so think about the word count and make a conscious decision on the length of your novel.

But what about word count per scene?

When you’re about to begin a big-picture edit, you may wonder if counting the number of words per scene is important. We think it is, and we’ll tell you why.

Scene Emphasis

After you’re happy with the total word count for your novel, it’s time to evaluate how your word count is spread across your scenes.

By counting the words in each scene, you can see where you are putting emphasis and where you are not. Without knowing the specific word count, you don’t have a method to know if a critical scene is too short or a minor scene is too long.

Patterns

Some authors like to write scenes of the same length for the entire novel. Others vary the scene word count. The choice is yours, and you can use it to your advantage if you evaluate the per scene word count from a big-picture view.
If you follow a pattern (same word count per scene) throughout your novel and one scene is way longer than the rest of your scenes, make sure this is the climax scene. If it’s not, you probably have too many words in the scene.

How I Used Word Count To Improve My Novel

You can see in the Word Count Per Scene graph below, that scene 2 in chapter 3 is over 6000 words long. The other scenes in the novel are all under 2000 words. I discovered this during my big-picture edit of DESCENT (my first novel).

This was a scene early in the novel where my main protagonist, Kalin Thompson, moves to Stone Mountain Resort. In great detail, the scene described Kalin moving into her new apartment. After I looked at the word count, I realized I’d written the scene to give the reader a feel for resort life. Nothing much happened in the scene to move the plot forward.

I knew I needed to fix this. Instead of putting the details in one scene, I cut the scene and sprinkled the details throughout the other scenes.

This improved the story by eliminating an info dump but still leaving in details that showed the reader what it’s like to move to a ski resort. If I hadn’t reviewed the word count of the scene in the context of the other scenes, I might have missed this.

How The Feedback App Will Help

Depending on the software you use to write your novel, counting the words in each scene can be a time-consuming exercise.

For example: In Microsoft word, you’ll highlight each scene and look at the word count displayed at the bottom of each page. In Scrivener, it’s a little easier. The word count is displayed at the bottom of each screen if you’ve broken your text into scenes as you write. In either case, you’ll have to keep track of the word count and evaluate it from a manuscript level.

The Feedback app will automatically break your novel into scenes and create a report showing you how many words are in each scene. You’ll be shown a graph, and can easily see where you need to focus on word count. Word count is one of the Key Elements Of Fiction the app uses to help you perform your own big-picture edit.

The Feedback App will also show you the breakdown of scenes per chapter. We’ll talk about this in another blog.

Download our free eBook, BIG-PICTURE Editing And The Key Elements Of Fiction and learn how big-picture editing is all about evaluating the major components of your story. We call these components the Key Elements Of Fiction. Our eBook shows you how to use the key elements of fiction to evaluate your story and become your own big-picture editor.

Enjoy the writing process, what ever stage you are in. I’m re writing and enjoying the journey. It’s much easier when you return to the manuscript with fresh eyes. 

Until next post, 

Glennis Browne

Author of The Fortune Seekers- Dan and Charlotte.

How should non-POV characters talk about your protagonist?

Today’s guest blog is by KM Weiland. I hope you find it helpful.

How should non-POV characters talk about your protagonist?Your Questions Answered: What if All Your Plot Points Aren’t Perfectly Timed?

Q. Can multiple character arcs, and the three acts, still work if each arc rolls through the story at different points, all climaxing at the end? The main character has her Midpoint in, say, chapter 10, but she is held back by other key characters whose Midpoint comes later.—Andrew S.

A. Timing in a novel is generally much more flexible than in shorter mediums, such as movies and short stories. In my own writing, I always strive for as near perfect timing as possible, while still giving myself the leeway of several chapters to either side if necessary.

The final litmus test is always: does it work? If your pacing feels good, even if the structural timing is a little off, then I definitely wouldn’t worry about it.

It’s best if you can coordinate the various arcs and plots into simultaneous timing as much as possible, to create a cumulative effect of the specific emotional beats you’ll be hitting. However, this isn’t always 100% possible.

Always strive to have the protagonist’s arc and plot structure be the one closest to the proper timing, since that will be the spine upon which the rest of your story is built.

Happy writing. Enjoy the learning curve. Write that book that lives inside of you. 

Regards, Glennis Browne 

Author of The Fortune Seekers- Dan and Charlotte


Story setting ideas: 6 effective setting examples and tips

Story setting ideas: 6 effective setting examples and tips, another helpful blog by NowNovelhttp://www.nownovel.com/blog


The best book setting ideas are effective. In a novel where the author performs careful worldbuilding, the story setting enriches plot events with atmosphere and mood; context and contrast. Here are 6 story setting examples and tips we can glean from how effective they are:

1. Give your story setting detail – J.K. Rowling’s Hogwarts

A magical ‘elsewhere’ is one of the key ingredients of many fantasy novels, particularly in portal fantasies where characters travel between our ordinary world and a world of magical landscapes and creatures.

One of the reasons why children (and adults) around the world fell in love with J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series is the depth and intricacy of Rowling’s settings. Rowling’s world is one of stark contrasts, from Harry’s aunt and uncle’s ordinary and oppressive suburban home to the towering spires of the series’ school of magic, Hogwarts.

Like Rowling, give your setting detail. Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is a character in itself. Portraits of prior staff hanging in corridors are animated and talk. Stairways move by enchantment. Even the ceiling design of the school’s dining hall changes according to school events and seasons. Further, Rowling is smart because she gradually reveals details of Hogwarts’ many additional rooms and secrets over the course of the series. There is thus setting development as the reader moves deeper into her fictional world.

As you plan and create your setting, think about how you can expand your characters’ environment as the story unfolds. For example, if you’re writing a novel set in a real-world city, think about how a plot development might take a primary character to a region of the city they’ve never frequented. This expansive approach to setting helps to prevent a static, unchanging and ultimately boring setting.

2. Learn from vivid story setting examples – Charles Dickens’ London

The Victorian author Charles Dickens was a master at crafting believable, mood-filled settings. Dickens’ London is almost a character in itself in novels such as Great Expectations (1861) and Nicholas Nickleby (1861). In this setting description example from Oliver Twist (1838), Dickens creates a journey into the bustling heart of 19th Century London:

The public-houses, with gas-lights burning inside, were already open. By degrees, other shops began to be unclosed, and a few scattered people were met with. Then, came straggling groups of labourers going to their work; then, men and women with fish-baskets on their heads; donkey-carts laden with vegetables; chaise-carts filled with livestock or whole carcasses of meat; milk-women with pails; an unbroken concourse of people trudging out with various supplies to the eastern suburbs of the town. As they approached the City, the noise and traffic gradually increased; when they threaded the streets between Shoreditch and Smithfield, it had swelled into a roar of sound and bustle.

In just a few lines, Dickens conveys the passage from city outskirts to inner city and the multitude and variety of inhabitants you would find in this place, at this time. If you’re setting your novel in a real city, whether now or in the past, find novels set in the same area and examine how other authors have conveyed place successfully.

3. Make setting actively contribute to your plot direction – Tolkien’s Middle Earth

A great setting plays its own part in a story’s events. Lovers meet by chance on the underground, brought together by a city’s transport infrastructure. In a fantasy novel, impassable terrain tests the ingenuity and resolve of a band of adventurers.

Tolkien’s Middle Earth from the Lord of the Rings cycle is an excellent example of ‘active’, effective setting and worldbuilding. The further Frodo and the Fellowship of the Ring pass from the Hobbit’s home territory, The Shire, the more danger they encounter in the landscape.

For example, when the band attempts to cross the Misty Mountains in their travels towards Mordor, their progress is impeded by heavy snowfall and they are attacked by mountain dwelling ‘wargs’. This forces them to go through an underground pass (the Mines of Moria), itself fraught with danger and environmental obstacles.

Even if your novel is not fantasy, your story setting can help to carve out a path for characters. A character living in the countryside who moves to the city (or vice versa) will encounter new challenges, from different mindsets and ways of life to changed economic and other circumstances.

4. Show the effects of time in setting – Evelyn Waugh’s Brideshead Revisited

Time is a vital component of story setting. Dickens’ Victorian London is wholly different from the London we find today, no longer populated by countless hawkers and horse-drawn carts. Showing how your setting changes over time adds a sense of history and evolution to your story.

In his novel Brideshead Revisited (1945), Evelyn Waugh creates a strong sense of history through setting. He shows his protagonist Charles Ryder visit his friend’s family mansion before and after World War II. The once-grand building has been damaged and acquires a ghostly, nostalgic character as time and historical events change it completely.

If your story spans multiple months, years or even decades, think about how time might impact setting:

Will familiar locations – shops and bars, for example – expand, move or close down?

In a city setting, is the city in growth or decline? Are new places opening or are buildings being boarded up and abandoned?

This setting element is especially important when writing fiction set in a real time and place – read up about the conditions of the time and make your setting show these conditions. For example, if writing about the post-war recession in the 20th Century, show, via setting, the effects of time and change on your characters’ surrounds.

5. Use setting symbolically – C.S. Lewis’ Narnia

Besides giving context and a backdrop for your story’s action, setting also supplies symbols. For example, the abandoned house in horror fiction is a setting symbolizing disappearance. We associated a house with habitation, thus there is an implicit, suspenseful ‘missing’ in horror’s abandoned homes. This sets the scene for alternate habitations – poltergeists, deranged killers and other ‘unhomely’, ominous figures.

In C.S. Lewis’ fantasy series, The Chronicles of Narnia, Lewis’ setting is rich with symbolism. In The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (1950), the central characters discover a hidden fantasy world presided over by the ‘White Witch’, Narnia’s self-proclaimed queen. It is always winter in Narnia due to the White Witch having cast a spell over the land.

This static time setting is symbolic of the tyranny of the White Witch’s rule, the harshness and limited freedoms she imposes on her animal subjects. The perpetual winter also symbolises the suspension of the usual order of cyclical death and rebirth implicit in seasonal change from winter to summer and back. This element thus supplies some of the tension of the novel as Narnia waits for the chance to resume life’s usual cycles.

When crafting your novel’s setting, think about what time and place in your story symbolize. In Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings cycle, for example, each geographical area has its own landscape reflecting, in part, the character of its inhabitants. The peace-loving Hobbits’ Shire is all green, rolling hills, while the villain’s homeland Mordor is full of sulphur pits and jagged mountain ranges.

6. Use the five senses to deepen setting description – Charles Dickens’ Hard Times

A vivid scene includes more than a visual sense of setting alone. Other details – the smell, feel and sound of a place – are equally important.

When describing a place in fiction, think about the sounds, smells and other sense details that distinguish it from others. Here is Dickens describing the industrial city of Coketown, for example, in Hard Times (1854):

It was a town of red brick, or of brick that would have been red if the smoke and ashes had allowed it; but as matters stood, it was a town of unnatural red and black … It had a black canal in it, and a river that ran purple with ill-smelling dye, and vast piles of building full of windows where there was a rattling and a trembling all day long, and where the piston of the steam-engine worked monotonously up and down, like the head of an elephant in a state of melancholy madness.

In addition to visual description, Dickens includes smell (the river pollution) and the ‘monotonous’ sounds of industry. In sum, the description conjures a vivid mental image of the town. Dickens also shows how the industrial activities that take place in his setting alter it. Setting and action affect each other.

What are your favourite setting descriptions? Share in the comments. Then join Now Novel to hone your setting using our tools and resources and get helpful feedback on your own setting descriptions.

False Agreements and How They Drive Characters in Your Fiction or Memoir

False Agreements and How They Drive Characters in Your Fiction or Memoir, by Mary Carroll MooreWhat I call the “inner story” in fiction or memoir just refers to the transformation of a character or narrator through a series of outer events. It’s pretty simple, but its success depends on something called “false agreements.”  

Without this transformation, and the false agreements that propel it, a story is just a list of crises. Readers want to witness growth.  

Transformation doesn’t just occur, right? It usually happens from a series of events that create change. To make each change real for the reader, we have to consider where the character’s journey starts. Usually, there is something they don’t fully understand. Something they are challenged by.

I like to look at this as a kind of agreement. The character decides something is true–even if it isn’t–and agrees to operate as if it is. As the story goes along, the writer challenges this belief, conviction, desire or hope or fear, this agreement with self, another, or situation, and slowly proves it false.  

At the beginning, the false agreement might be quite intact. As the story goes along, each event breaks down this agreement. By the end, even the character must see that it’s not real. By the end, there is a new realization.

What are some false agreements in story?

In Janet Fitch’s novel White Oleander, the false agreement is that the narrator, a teenage girl, believes she can help her mother stay out of danger. This proves false when the mother decides to kill her boyfriend and ends up in prison, abandoning her daughter.

In Jeanette Walls’s memoir The Glass Castle, the false agreement is that the narrator, a young girl, believes that her crazy family is eccentric but normal. This falls apart as the parents take more risks and put the girl in danger.    

In Lief Enger’s novel Peace Like a River, the false agreement is that justice can prevail–when a young girl is attacked by boys in town and her brother defends her, his family can bring him back into the family. Proven false when the brother runs away and aligns with a serial killer.

A false agreement will always be revealed as false by the end of the book. It may be accepted, then denied, then accepted again during the story–humans rarely travel a straight line in growth–but it is exposed by the end for what it is. Even if the character ends up in permanent denial, the reader has seen the agreement as fully false.

Your Weekly Writing Exercise: How to Set Up a False Agreement in Your Story

Understanding a false agreement means really knowing your character. If you didn’t get a sense of the false agreement last week, here are some next steps. 

Most writers start by describing the status quo that the story starts with. What does everybody put up with, to get along? What are the accepted beliefs?    

Some examples of false agreements from different books I’ve read lately:

1. If I’m good enough, nothing bad will happen.

2. If I protect my sister, she won’t be abused.

3. If I go there in person, I can find the truth.

4. If I keep silent, nobody will get hurt.

There are hundreds of possibilities, and yours will be unique. The “hook” of your story starts from this false agreement. Because something will happen to immediately cast doubt over this false agreement, right? That’s what launches your story.

Once you have your false agreement sketched out (spend 15-20 minutes freewriting on what it could be), your next step is to chart how that agreement will get busted up.

In all stories, there are small and large epiphanies where the character gradually realizes the agreement may not be all it’s cracked up to be. Maybe a hint of that is early in the story, within the first third. It can be a small epiphany, or turning point.  

But the character often perseveres and tries to keep the false agreement going. Then there’s a bigger event that cracks it even more: often, at this point, the character decides not to take this #%$$ anymore and reinvents themselves or gets new help or new clues. This might happen midway through the story.  

There’s is often a revision of the false agreement, a new false agreement, if you will, that is closer to the truth but not quite it. (Why? Because you still have half the story to get through, and false agreements create the conflict that drives the character. So you don’t want to get rid of the false agreement entirely, not yet.)

Usually, near the end of the story, the smaller epiphanies result in a major one. At this point, the character sees truth.  

They become different, fundamentally. And they make changes that really show how far they have come since the start of the story.

History Revisited…. tell myself ‘must note in diary’

I had forgotten I submitted a written interview to this website. Must  remember to check it out on 20 April 2017

History Imagined’s Getting into Character feature. 

The response to our call for submissions has been a little overwhelming, but I will try to be as accommodating as I am able regarding dates.Your novel sounds like it would appeal to our readers. I have attached the interview guidelines. Please read through them to the end as there are three rather lengthy sections of options for questions to pose to the character being “interviewed.” I will need your interview, bio, cover, headshot, etc. no later than two weeks prior to the publication date.

Your interview post date:
Thursday, April 20, 2017 

Welcome to History Imagined!

http://www.lindapennell.com/ 

http://historyimagined.wordpress.com  

Name: Glennis Browne

Email: glentrev@gmail.com

Website: https://glenniswritingabc.wordpress.com

Comment: ‘The Fortune Seekers – Dan and Charlotte’ was published August 2016. The author- Glennis Browne chronicles a compelling tale of 18th century immigrants in Australia

Glennis Browne explains why immigrants moved to Australia in the 1800s through her debut novel, “The Fortune Seekers – Dan and Charlotte” (published by Xlibris AU). The author explores real incidents of struggle and poverty during the Australian gold rush years. Does love bring peace? Will understanding and forgiveness return faith in God? The 21st century reader may learn of the reality of their ancestors’ lives and find answers in this book. 
Steam level- not steamy, but sensitively written to hint at physical desire and subsequent feelings and emotions. Including grief, shame, anger and love.

Dan and Charlotte need to make courageous decisions. Dan, a deep thinker, challenges accepted beliefs of a Christian denomination gaining converts throughout the century. Branded a rebellious non conformist, he longs to escape confusing religious doctrinal beliefs. 
Charlotte sees ahead a lifetime of shame and disgrace. Separately, they begin adventurous and challenging lives, joining the thousands of emigrants who join the early pioneers in Australia. In this novel, the struggles of supporting large families and dealing with grief and poverty during the Australian gold rush years come alive. But can real love change everything?

An excerpt from the book:

‘This isn’t the freedom I’m after!’ His cry is from his heart.‘You misunderstand freedom, Daniel. You want freedom? Then break free, step off into the unknown. Come follow me!’The mocking voice drives his confused mind unrelentingly into a place of greater instability.’

With its well-drawn characters and riveting plot, “The Fortune Seekers – Dan and Charlotte” is a book of crisis, hope, adventure and challenge. It shows the repercussions of sexual experimentation, marital infidelity and finally the security of forming loving relationships. The challenges experienced by those living in the mid 1800s are examined. Answered and expressed within the novel, by close and intimate communication between the main characters, as the author quickly brings their personalities alive. Not just a love story, but more like a historical look at conditions of life in the 1860s in the well researched areas of South Wales, Essex England, and New South Wales of Australia during the gold rush years. Also the experience of immigrating in the cramped steerage sailing ships or as a press ganged sailor.
About the Author

Glennis Browne began writing as a child. Completing a 12-chapter book in an exercise book and three comic story books, she unfortunately lost all of them over the years. Later while in teacher training, she wrote children’s books. After the advent of the computer, she wrote her autobiography. Her interest in historical research brought to light questions of why certain situations happened within her family such as emigration and religious thinking. After undertaking biblical studies and doing emotional healing training, these questions about her past kept resurfacing. A decade of family tree and historical research birthed the first of the series of “The Fortune Seekers.” Born in New Zealand, she immigrated to Australia with her husband, to live closer to their two sons and their families.

Time: September 8, 2016 at 7:02 am

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