10 Tips For Creating Your First Children’s Picture Book | BookBaby Blog

A children’s picture book may seem simple, but creating a brilliant one is no easy task. How do you make yours smart, engaging, and fun?
— Read on blog.bookbaby.com/2012/07/ten-tips-for-creating-your-first-childrens-picture-book/

Hi to my friends and followers.

Recently I assisted a young nephew with a story he had written. He could picture his story in a book, with his name on the cover. Ideas flowed as I worked on his story, typing it up into written form. Ideas such as, maybe I can write a children’s book to add to my historical novels in The Fortune Seeker Series?

It is not necessarily a picture book, but something where a child might contribute and make it his own. Any child, from any country.

For I had dreamed up an idea that must remain hush-hush until I can share it. Watch this space in 2019.

Perhaps you are interested in creating a picture book yourself. These suggestions from a BookBaby Blog may be helpful.

Until next time,

Glennis

My young nephews short story

https://1drv.ms/w/s!AgWOVPWMFHZ9grEL4m07lViunkS18A

Spencer is aged about seven or eight. He lives with his parents in New Zealand.

When we met at my brothers 70th birthday recently Spencer was curious after holding in his hands the latest of my novels. An ambition was birthed that day.

That afternoon I became aware of this young lad writing his own story. When I asked what he was writing about doing he proudly showed me his story.

I suggested he wrote it as if it was a book; drawing a cover on the front and writing the words in the pages – which he did. (His manuscript is below)

He read it to me, proud as can be.

I asked Spencer what he would like to do with it, and he asked me to turn it into a book. Publishing it. Creating a cover. Naming him as the author.

Why not? I thought. Encouragement at this age just may be the very thing that will make this child excel and do something in his life that is uniquely who he is.

Today I worked on his story, added bits and enlarged the storyline, then sent it away for his parents to photocopy and staple it as a book.

Below is my version of his story.

Written by Spencer Ladds

February 2019

Published by Aunty Glennis

March 2019

The Mysterious Island and The Boy Named Jack

Once apon a time a little boy wanted to go fishing.

So he jumped into his canoe and paddled away to a good spot.

Then he spotted an amazing Island, so he paddled away to the island. It was amazing ….. …. because it glistened in the sunlight as if it was a mirage.

‘I’m going to check out what is on the island,’ Jack said.

Once he got there he wondered what the island was called, because nothing seemed real.

So, he tried to find someone to ask but he couldn’t find anyone else on the island.

‘I shall name it Lonely Mystery Island,’ Jack said to himself walking towards his canoe. But he couldn’t find the canoe. It had disappeared.

‘Perhaps the canoe was washed away by the waves as the tide had come in while I was exploring the island.’

Jack looked in every cove, behind every bush, but couldn’t find it anywhere.

‘It is no use,’ he thought, ‘I am stranded with no food. And something on the island isn’t friendly as this place feels spooky.’

Then Jack heard a loud, ‘Boo!’ and he leaped like a spring into the air before tripping over a log. Behind him he heard footsteps following him along the sand. Jack started running towards a palm tree. And he fell hitting his head on a tree branch.

‘Ouch,’ he said, rubbing the sore spot on his head before standing up again.

‘I’m out of here,’ he said, ‘as something is strange about this island.’

‘Boo!’ something shouted again, as Jack continued running along the sand; ducking and diving from whatever was hitting his body while he was running. It felt like small stones or peanuts.

‘Aagh!’ Jack said, reaching for something to hold to protect himself as he was now frightened; He picked up a palm leaf.

‘What was it that went boo!’ Jack shouted, ’is someone else here? I can hear you. You didn’t scare me, all I need is help,’ Jack shouted.

‘Help?’ a voice asked from near him, ‘Hehehe, you are a funny little boy.’

Jack held up the palm frond, listening. ‘I’m Jack. I need help.’

‘I need you as well Jack as I’m actually very hungry. Tell me, do you taste good, Jack the little boy?’

Jack realises he might be in danger, and says, ‘I must out run what-ever it is. Perhaps I can climb this palm tree and there I’ll be safe.’

And he did climb the palm tree.

While trying to climb the palm tree in his bare feet, Jack heard something strange – like someone laughing. It sounded like there was a monkey higher up the palm tree. Clinging to the palm tree Jack scanned the palm fronds to see what was laughing at him.

All of a sudden, coconuts began falling from the top of the palm tree.

‘Oh no, I am being attacked. Stop It,’ Jack called. ‘I am not food. I am a boy and I can’t leave the island because I have lost my canoe. Will you help me?

‘Hehehe’ was the only reply.

‘Are you a monkey?’ Jack shouted.

‘No, I am not a monkey,’ the voice laughed.

‘What are you then?’ Jacked asked.

Now you can finish the story……..(see Hints on last pages)

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The End

Did you look at the hints over the following pages?

Written by Spencer Ladds and Aunty Glennis. – Well done Spencer. Do continue writing your stories. The End –

Comma Rules: A Quick Quide | Grammarly

Not sure about commas? We’ve got you covered. Learn the essentials about commas in English quickly.
— Read on www.grammarly.com/blog/comma/

This article by Grammarly, although long, is extensive. It is worth reading if you are being tripped up when editing your writing.

I write Historical Fiction focusing on social, political and religious attitudes that affected the lives of our ancestors in the late 1800s.

Both novels have thought provoking stories based on real lives.

Perhaps this short promo video may wet your appetite to read one of the novels.

– You may view my video at the link below. Thank you.

https://youtu.be/tGmaalu4RHc

YouTube:

Here is the Amazon Link-

https://www.https://youtu.be/tGmaalu4RHcamazon.com/Fortune-Seekers-Dan-Charlotte/dp/1514497522