Learn the 5 secrets to communicate your love for your dog in a language they’ll understand! They’ll DEFINITELY know you adore them when you try any of these. 🙂

Hi Annie,
We know you’re crazy about your pup. And you show that love every time you pet them, play with them, give them special snacks, or just tell them how great they are! 🙂
But did you know there are other ways to communicate to your dog how much you adore them — in dog language?
Here are 5 ways to tell your pup you love them in doggy language. ❤️❤️❤️

1. Gaze into their eyes.
The next time you’re relaxing with your dog, stare deeply into their eyes while telling them how much you love them. Sustained eye contact will release oxytocin in your dog’s brain — the same chemical that bonds mothers and children. (Don’t do this with a dog you don’t know, as direct eye contact can also be considered a threat!)

2. Lean on them.
Many dogs don’t like being hugged. But they do crave physical closeness. Instead of hugging your dog, try leaning on them or pressing against them in a gentle and reassuring way. Add a couple of tummy scratches, and your pooch will definitely be feeling the love!

3. Raise your eyebrows.
This one’s a little weird. 🙂 But dog behavior experts say that the more you move your face when you’re greeting your dog, the more your dog will know you think they’re awesome! Dogs tend to raise their eyebrows as a gesture of recognition when they see their beloved owners. So if you do it back, they’ll feel extra-loved in return!

4. Sleep next to them.
Cuddling with your pup when they’re sleepy will make them feel very close to you, as that’s when they’re at their most vulnerable. You can snuggle up to them in bed, on your couch, or even on the floor! What matters is the feelings of affection and warmth your dog will feel as they’re drifting off. 😴

5. Just be yourself!
Dogs are incredibly emotionally sensitive, and they can sense how you feel about them through your voice, your gestures, and your actions. So if you love your pup, just keep loving your pup! They’ll be able to tell, and they’ll love you back…even more than they already do. 🐶💕
Yours,
The Dog Pawty Team

Dog Pawty 2140 South Dupont Highway Camden, DE 19934

How to Crisp Up Your Writing–Revision Tools for Wordsmithing

Once again I am reblogging one of Mary Carroll Moores’s writing tips. 

For over a year she has reminded me or taught me a lot  about writing. Mary and the AutoCrit Programme have been my teachers in the writing of The Fortune Seekers.

 Today’s article is on crisp writing – something quite new to me a year ago. Perhaps my readers may also benefit from this refresher.

 How to Crisp Up Your Writing–Revision Tools for Wordsmithing. By- 

(Quoted by Mary)

I’m a lifelong learner–there’s always so much new stuff to practice and absorb about making great books. I take different online classes for accountability and to keep up with new writing ideas.  

This summer, I took two classes on revision.  

We posted our writing for feedback. Writers were experienced and got mostly positive comments, but occasionally we’d see this: “I love your writing but can you make it a little crisper?”

Crisp writing. What is that? 

 Tight, toned, well paced, fairly bouncing off the page. Stands out to a reader, an agent, an editor.  

Easier said than written, I think!  

Crisp doesn’t usually appear in early drafts (if it does, you might be holding back too much, wordsmithing too soon!). Early drafts are about content and structure, exploring what you want the writing to say, what flow you’re after. It takes a while to get these two aspects solid. In books, even longer. I find about 80 percent of total time with a book, from idea to publication, is spent on content and structure. So if you’re still there, don’t worry too much. Take your time–you need to get this part right before you begin to work on tightening the prose. Otherwise you’ll have beautiful sentences that mean nothing.

But once you’re ready to crisp it up, here are some global searches that help me a lot:

1. Search for “was” and “were” and “are”–any form of the verb “to be.” E.B. White who coauthored the famous book The Elements of Style, talks about this being a blah verb, one that doesn’t provoke imagery or excitement in a reader. It’s true–and when you do a search for “was,” and begin to see how often you use it (was staring instead of stared, for instance), you’ll be stunned. Replace with more direct, active, vivid verbs.

2. Then search for “-ing.” Again, this form of the verb denotes progressive movement, rather than anything sharp and decisive. You’ll need it sometimes, but writers use it a LOT more than they should, IMHO. Replace where you can.

3. Look for repetitive sentence patterns. My unconscious pattern is groups of three actions in one sentence (they sat, ate, then left). Find yours–easier with feedback from a close reader. Then vary, vary, vary!

4. Watch out for your use of sentence fragments. These are great little punches every now and then but like any device, they can be overused.  

5. Cut some of that imagery, especially as “stage set” at the opening of a chapter or scene. Do you need to set the stage? Can you just jump right into action?

6. Search for “-ly” words, the dreaded adverb which Stephen King rails against in his writing-craft book On Writing. Delete whenever possible.  

7. Search for “suddenly,” “finally,” and “at last”–these can create melodrama, so be sure you need them when you use them. I’m guilty of three to four “suddenly’s” in one page!

There are more, but this should give you a good start.

Thank you once again Mary for your valuable tips.

http://www.Xlibris.com/book sales/TheFortuneSeekers-Dan

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Challenging Moral Beliefs – guest blog by -writershelpingwriters.net

Deepen The Protagonist to Readers By Challenging His or Her Moral Beliefs

Posted on May 28, 2016 by Angela Ackerman

When we sit down to brainstorm a character, we think about possible qualities, flaws, quirks, habits, likes and dislikes that they might have. Then to dig deeper, we assemble their backstory, plotting out who influenced them, what experiences shaped them (both good and bad) and which emotional wounds pulse beneath the surface. All of these things help us gain a clearer sense of who our characters are, what motivates them, and ultimately, how they will behave in the story.

But how often do we think about our protagonist’s morality? It’s easy to just make the assumption that he or she is “good” and leave it at that.

And, for the most part, the protagonist is good–that’s why he or she is the star of the show. The protagonist’s moral code dictates which positive traits are the most prominent (attributes like loyalty, kindness, tolerance, being honorable or honest, to name a few) and how these will in turn influence every action and decision.

In real life, most people want to believe they know right from wrong, and that when push comes to shove, they’ll make the correct (moral) choice. People are generally good, and unless you’re a sociopath, no one wants to go through life hurting people. Sometimes it can’t be avoided, but most try to add, not take away, from their interactions and relationships.

To feel fully fleshed, our characters should mimic real life, meaning they too have strong beliefs, and like us, think their moral code is unshakable. But while it might seem it, morality is not black and white. It exists in the mists of grey.

Extreme circumstances can cause morals to shift. What would it take for your “moral” protagonist to make an immoral choice?

Is your character deeply honest? What might push her to lie about something important?

Is your character honorable? What would force him to act dishonorably?

Is your character kind? How could life break her so that she does something maliciously hurtful?

When your protagonist is forced to enter a grey area that causes them to question what is right and wrong…this is where compelling conflict blooms!

YOUR TURN: Have you built in situations that force the hero to evaluate his morality? If not, what can you do within the scope of your story to push him into the grey where he must wrestle with his beliefs? What event might send him to the edge of himself, of who he is, and possibly force him to step across the line dividing right and wrong?

Tools to help you understand your character better:

The Reverse Backstory Tool: Hit all the highlights on your hero’s backstory reel, including his Emotional Wound & The Lie He Believes About Himself

The Character Target Tool: Set the path of your hero’s positive traits, spiraling out from Moral based attributes

The Character Pyramid Tool: Plot your character’s flaws that stem from a Wounding Event &visualize how these flaws present as behaviors & thought

Originally posted at IWSG

    Related

10 Reasons Why Your Hero Needs Flaws

In “Character Flaws”

Will Readers Find Your Protagonist Worthy?

In “Character Traits”

Personality Traits: Building a Balanced Character

In “Balance”

– See more at: http://writershelpingwriters.net/2016/05/deepen-character-readers-challenging-moral-beliefs/#.dpuf

Family, history and health

My blogs are in relation to the art of writing, and sharing family stories discovered after years of historical research. What I’ve discovered brings to mind the challenges of the time. Mysteries are unravelled, by turning the lives into personalities, by turning the stories into fiction – Resulting in much loved characters from my past overcoming life and seeking their Fortunes. Hence – “The Fortune Seekers” novels are underway.

The Fortune Seekers preview

My manuscript has gone its merry way to the place where completed manuscripts end up! With the publisher.
Time for a preview?

It’s now time….

Here we go…. Read on
‘Daniel, do it. Take your life into your own hands’, it mocks him, laughing as it taunted.

 

‘This isn’t the freedom I’m after!’ His cry is from his heart.

 

‘You misunderstand freedom, Daniel. You want freedom? Then break free, step off into the unknown. Come follow me!’

 

The mocking voice drives his confused mind unrelentingly into a place of greater instability.

 

‘Leave me alone!’ Dan screams.

 

The strong Atlantic air current pushes against his body, his raised arms making him unstable. He wavers in the wind, unsteady on his feet.

 

Momentarily, neurotically, believing he is enjoying the instability of the erratic swaying sensation, despite the pounding of his heart and the rising tension disturbing his mind. His breathing is rushed – he is panicking – yet doing nothing to prevent disaster.

 

‘Go on. Don’t be scared. Take the first step. For once take your life into your own hands, and follow me’, repeats the eerie voice.

 

‘No!’

It unrelentingly continues challenging Dan.

 ‘Stop shrinking back from decision-making. For once, take control.’

 

‘I want freedom, not death.’ His cry is weak and unconvincing.

 

‘Death is without sting for those who believe. Death brings freedom. You do believe this?’ taunts the demonic voice.

 

‘No!’

 

‘Set yourself free from being controlled. Think for yourself. Be a man, Daniel. Follow me. Step into the unknown.’

 

A shudder passes through Dan’s body. Confusion compounds.

A bewildered cry to the heavens comes from deep within his tortured soul. ‘Not this way. Freedom isn’t found this way . . . Oh God, help me!’

 

Around him, thunderclaps travelling across the sky echo around the hills as if the taunting spirit is spreading its fingers wide, throwing lightning from the booming clouds suddenly formed overhead, -determined to frighten the man on the cliff edge as a battle rages in the heavens.

 

Dan stands his ground, whispering, ‘God, help me . . . to live.’
Just a teaser. The Fortune Seekers should be published end of June on Xlibris .com.au and all ebook sites.